Kun Lee

Kun Lee is a doctoral student in social policy at the Department of Social Policy and Intervention (DSPI) and a member of Wolfson College at the University of Oxford. He previously worked as a research and administrative officer at the Institute of Social Welfare, Seoul National University and IARU Global Intern at the Oxford Institute of Population Ageing.

His doctoral project is concerned with the relationship between labour market participation and social inequalities within the older population, from both micro- and macro-level perspectives. His research particularly focuses on institutional arrangements, such as pension systems and labour market institutions, that promote old-age employment and shape labour market opportunities among the elderly. His work also examines the impact of late-career trajectories on the material and subjective well-being of older people across welfare regimes.

On top of his doctoral thesis, Kun is involved in several research projects to evaluate the impact of basic pensions on poverty alleviation and to explore the institutional drivers of pension reforms in South Korea. Kun’s other research interests include lowest-low fertility and policy responses in the East Asian context, quantitative methods in social science and comparative research designs.

Originally from South Korea, Kun holds a dual BA degree in Social Welfare and Economics with high honours from Seoul National University and the MSc in Comparative Social Policy (Distinction) from the DSPI at the University of Oxford. Kun’s doctoral research is made possible by the generous support of the Centenary Scholarship from the DSPI and the Doctoral Fellowship from the Korea Foundation for Advanced Studies.

 

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Lee, K. and Zaidi, A. (2020), "How policy configurations matter: a critical look into pro-natal policy in South Korea based on a gender and family framework", International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Vol. 40 No. 7/8, pp. 589-606. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJSSP-12-2019-0260